Digitally Sign a PDF Document with Power Automate

We’re pleased to announce a new Power Automate action, ‘Sign PDF‘ for Encodian ‘Flowr‘, which provides the capability to digitally sign a PDF document in Power Automate with two different options. The ‘Standard‘ option uses Encodian’s ‘Adobe Approved Trust List‘ certificate. Thus, a signed document will appear as an approved signature with long-term validation enabled (the signature image is optional).

The ‘Custom‘ option allows you to provide a custom certificate in PFX format, which is used to sign the document. The validity of the signature will depend on the certificate provided.

NOTE: At the time of writing (9th November 2022), Microsoft is working on the global deployment of this action, which is due to complete by 30th November 2022.

Sign a PDF Document after approval in Power Automate

To provide an example of using the ‘Sign PDF‘ action, we’ll cover a very common scenario; after a document has been approved via a Power Automate approval process, we’ll create a signed PDF rendition of the selected document.

Consider the following simple flow associated with a specific SharePoint library. The user can select a file in SharePoint and submit it for approval to the specified ‘Approver’. The approval outcome is then emailed to the user who started the flow… simple!

We’re now going to extend this flow to convert the selected document to PDF and add a digital signature using the ‘Sign PDF‘ action before adding the signed PDF document to the SharePoint library!

1. Within the ‘If yes‘ branch, add the SharePoint ‘Get File Content‘ action

1.a Site Address: Set as per the ‘Site Address‘ value for the ‘For a selected file‘ trigger actions ‘Site Address‘ value

1.b. File identifier: Select the ‘Identifier‘ property provided by the ‘Get file properties‘ action

2. Move the ‘Send and email (V2) – Approved‘ action beneath the SharePoint ‘Get File Content‘ action.

3. Underneath the SharePoint ‘Get File Content‘ action, add the Encodian ‘Convert to PDF‘ action

3.a. Filename: Select the ‘File name with extension‘ property provided by the ‘Get file properties‘ action

3.b. File Content: Select the ‘File Content‘ property provided by the ‘Get file content‘ action

3.c. PDF Filename: Select the ‘File name with extension‘ property provided by the ‘Get file properties‘ action

We’re now going to add the ‘Sign PDF‘ action by selecting the ‘Standard‘ certificate type. This uses Encodian’s ‘Adobe Approved Trust List‘ certificate. Thus a signed document will appear as an approved signature with long-term validation enabled.

The ‘Sign PDF‘ action advanced options allow you to configure whether an image signature should be visible, also providing the opportunity to provide your signature image. For example, you could pass an image generated from a PowerApp ‘Pen input’ control and use this as the signature image!

4. Underneath the SharePoint ‘Convert to PDF‘ action, add the Encodian ‘Sign PDF‘ action

4.a. Certificate Type: Select ‘Standard

4.b. File Content: Select the ‘File Content‘ property provided by the ‘Convert to PDF‘ action

5. Underneath the Encodian ‘Sign PDF‘ action, add the SharePoint ‘Create file‘ action

5.a. Site Address: Set as per the ‘Site Address‘ value for the ‘For a selected file‘ trigger actions ‘Site Address‘ value

5.b. Folder Path: Select the ‘Folder path‘ property provided by the ‘Get file properties‘ action

5.c. File Name: Select the ‘Filename‘ property provided by the Encodian ‘Sign PDF‘ action

5.d. File Content: Select the ‘File Content’ property provided by the Encodian ‘Sign PDF‘ action

That’s it all done! The Power Automate flow will now create a digitally signed PDF from the approved document! Your revised flow should look similar to the following:

After testing the flow, you should see the signed PDF document added to your SharePoint library:

Open the PDF within Adobe Acrobat (or equivalent) to view the signature:

Deploy your flow to all SharePoint Libraries

Don’t forget that you could deploy this flow to all SharePoint sites and libraries using Encodian ‘Trigr‘. For guidance on how to do this, please check out Publish an existing SharePoint Power Automate Flow to Multiple Libraries

Here is an example of the flow configuration, updated to support all SharePoint libraries:

Finally…

We hope this post provides a helpful example of digitally signing a PDF document using the Encodian ‘Sign PDF‘ action and Microsoft Power Automate.

Please share any feedback or comments – all are welcome 🙂

Insert HTML into a Word Document with Power Automate

An ever-present question we’re seeing via our support service and from within the Microsoft Power Automate community: How can I insert HTML data into a Microsoft Word Document using Power Automate? It’s pretty simple to use our ‘Populate Word Document‘ action, and this post will provide an example of how to use this feature.

If you’re new to the ‘Populate Word Document‘ action, we recommend reviewing this post’s ‘Populate Word Basic Principles‘ section: Populate a Word or PDF Document using Power Automate V2.

Further detailed guidance can be obtained on our support portal: Populate Word Document – Inserting HTML.

Add SharePoint-rich text data (HTML) to a Word Document

I’m not going to use a real-world scenario as such for this example, as we’ll focus on the mechanics of adding HTML data into a word document. For this basic scenario, I will obtain HTML data from a SharePoint list item column which contains rich text data, as this is an everyday use case. For this demo, I have configured a word document as follows:

I have created a SharePoint list item which contains the following data:

And I have made the following super simple flow:

I’m passing in the template word file when the flow is manually triggered. We then retrieve the item from SharePoint. The file is passed to the ‘Populate Word Document‘ action along with the value of the ‘HTML Example‘ column bounded by a basic JSON structure. We then add the populated document to Onedrive… simple! 🙂

When I execute the flow, it fails with the following error: A error occurred parsing the JSON document provided: After parsing a value, an unexpected character was encountered. This is because the ‘Document Data‘ property has received invalid JSON caused by unescaped double quotes.

HTML markup contains lots of double quotes (also known as speech marks), and if you want to insert HTML data into JSON, then you must escape the double quotes, which is luckily relatively simple and documented in detail here: Escape double quotes in JSON using Power Automate

To resolve this issue I need to wrap the ‘HTML Example‘ property value in the following expression: replace(<dynamicDataHere>,'”‘,’\”‘)

Now I can re-execute the flow successfully:

And validate that the HTML data has been added to the document correctly:

Finally…

We hope this post provides a helpful example of how to pass HTML data obtained from a PowerApp, website, SharePoint item, etc. and then add the HTML data into a Word document (which could also be converted to PDF!)

Please share any feedback or comments – all are welcome 🙂

Populate a Word or PDF Document using Power Automate V2

Want to know how to populate a Word or PDF document using Power Automate? Well, you’re in the right place!

Back in May 2020, we posted to show how you can dynamically add data to a PDF or Word document using the following Encodian actions:

Now, these actions still provide viable options for adding data to PDF / Word documents. Still, there is a fourth option which we’d suggest as the optimal solution for generating documents and populating them with data. The ‘Populate Word Document‘ action provides a powerful solution which handles conditional logic, repeating sections, table data, lists, HTML, document insertion, charts and much more! Please refer to the syntax documentation for further details: Template Syntax for Populate Word Document. We’ve previously posted example solutions which use the ‘Populate Word Document‘ action, which is well worth reviewing:

Populate Word Basic Principles

The ‘Populate Word Document‘ action requires two elements

1. File Content: The Microsoft Word Document (DOCX) to populate
2. Document Data: The JSON data to populate the document with

The Microsoft word document should be configured with tokens which will be replaced at runtime with the JSON data provided. An example of a token:

An example of a corresponding JSON data structure:

{
"companyName":"Encodian"    
}

Note the name of the JSON node matches the value of the token: companyName

Here is a very simple Flow which will populate the manually provided document and save the output to OneDrive:

The resulting document:

Create a document using data from a PowerApp

Consider this common scenario; We have a PowerApp which collates data for a business purpose, and once the data is collated, we need to create a document rendition of that data. I have set up a very simple PowerApp for conducting an ‘Employee Review’ to demonstrate this. I will pass the data to Power Automate to create a document representing the data captured during the review.

This is the super simple PowerApp, noting I have just added controls to a screen as opposed to using a form:

Follow these simple steps to update the PowerApp to pass data to a Power Automate flow.

1. Click ‘Power Automate‘ > ‘Create new flow.

 

2. Click ‘Create from blank.

3. Set a name for your Flow

4. Add the SharePoint ‘Get File Content‘ action or related action to obtain the ‘File Content’ of the Word template file.

The word template for this demo has been configured as follows:

5. Add the Encodian ‘Populate Word Document‘ action

5.a. File Content: Select the ‘File Content‘ property provided by the SharePoint ‘Get file content‘ action

5.b. Document Data: Select ‘Ask in PowerApps

We’ll configure the PowerApp to provide data as a JSON string. However, the pen input control within the example PowerApp will give the image as a dataUri value and not a base64 string.

The Encodian action only expects a base64 value; therefore, we can add this simple replace() expression to omit the unwanted dataUri details.

Additionally, the PowerApp will return the data as an array, but we only need access to a single property (the JSON string), so therefor we need to use the following complete expression configuration to replace the unwanted data values and obtain the first item within the array:  first(json(replace(<PowerAppProperty>,’data:image/png;base64,’,”)))

Update the flow as follows:

We now need to do something with the generated file. For this demo, we’ll save it to SharePoint. You may wish to parse the JSON value provided by PowerApp so that you can use this data within the flow. I’ve just hard-coded the filename value for demo purposes.

6. Add a SharePoint ‘Create file‘ action

6.a. Site Address: Set to the value of the SharePoint site, which contains the target document library

6.b. Folder Path: Set to the value of the target SharePoint folder

6.c. File Name: Enter the required value

6.d. File Content: Select the ‘File Content‘ property from the ‘Populate Word‘ action

7. Save and close the flow

8. Within the PowerApp, select your submit button, and click ‘Advanced.

9. Within the ‘OnSelect’ property, add the following configuration updating as required for your application:

ClearCollect(colData, 
{
employee: inpEmployee.Text,
employeeNumber: inpEmployeeNumber.Text,
role: inpRole.Text,
manager: inpMngrName.Text,
department: inpDepartment.Text,
managerRole: inpMngrRole.Text,
reviewDate: inpReviewDate.SelectedDate,
comments: inpComments.Text,
signature: inpSigned.Image
}
);

 

This configuration collates data within the form into a collection so we can pass it to the Power Automate flow.

10. Underneath the previously added configuration, append the following: ‘<autoSelect>‘.Run(JSON(colData, IncludeBinaryData));

11. Your PowerApp is ready for testing. On clicking the ‘Submit’ button, data will be sent to the Power Automate flow.

12. The Power Automate flow will be invoked, and the JSON data will be passed to the Encodian action

13. The document will be available from the configured location.

If a PDF rendition is required, update your flow to use the Encodian ‘Convert Word‘ action as follows:

Finally…

We hope this post provides valuable information on how to build documents passing dynamic data, specifically how to do this using data collated via a PowerApp.

Please share any feedback or comments – all are welcome 🙂

Publish an existing SharePoint Power Automate Flow to Multiple Libraries

make power automate flow available across sharepoint

So, you have created a Power Automate flow linked to a document library in SharePoint Online, and you now need to make this flow available across multiple SharePoint libraries.

We’ve all been here, and the options are limited. When you create a Power Automate flow linked to a document library in SharePoint Online, it is hard-coded to that document library. You’ll need to create a replicate flow for all other libraries you would like to use the flow… possible for a few libraries but not at scale, and it’s always a bad solution to create replicas!

For this post, we’re going to show you have you take your existing flow and re-configure it to be instantly available across all SharePoint Online document libraries using Encodian Trigr!

Consider this simple ‘Approval’ automation which can be launched from a single SharePoint document library:

This ‘Submit for Approval’ automation is only available on this document library and is configured as follows:

As depicted, the simple limitation is that the SharePoint actions are hard-coded to a specific site and document library! Let’s fix this!

Migrate an existing flow to Encodian Trigr

We will update this flow to use Encodian Trigr to make it available across all SharePoint Online document libraries.

If you haven’t already, you’ll need to set up Encodian Trigr takes five or so minutes to do, please check out this guide: Deploy a Power Automate Flow to multiple SharePoint libraries or lists

If you need to sign up for a trial, please visit: Sign up for a Trigr Trial

Choose your Power Automate trigger

1. Delete the ‘For a selected file’ trigger action from your flow

2. Enter ‘Encodian’ within the search box, select the ‘When a user runs a Trigr’ trigger action

3. Set the ‘Title’ and ‘Description’ fields

4. We now need to update the values applied to the SharePoint ‘Get File Properties’ action

4.a. Site Address: Select the ‘Site Address’ property provided by the ‘When a user runs a Trigr’ trigger action

4.b. Library Name: Select the ‘Library/List Name’ property provided by the ‘When a user runs a Trigr’ trigger action

4.c. Id: Select the ‘Item’ property provided by the ‘When a user runs a Trigr’ trigger action

5. Save the changes to your flow

The flow configuration update is complete! We now need to configure Encodian Trigr to make this flow available across all document libraries within our SharePoint Online tenant.

6. Navigate to your Encodian Account Portal

7. Login using the credentials supplied in the ‘Your Encodian Trigr Trial is ready!’ email

8. Select ‘Encodian Trigr’ > ‘Configuration’

9. Click ‘Add Action.

10. On the ‘Add Action’ form

10.a. Select your Microsoft Flow.

10.b. Update the ‘Title’ and ‘Description’ fields if required

10.c. Add a ‘Run Message’ which will be displayed to the user after the flow has been triggered

10.d. Del-select the ‘Lists’ checkbox in the ‘Appear in’ section. Our flow is document library-specific, so we do not want the action to appear within lists.

10.e. Click ‘Create.

11. Your ‘Action’ has now been created and will be available across all SharePoint sites

The action can be found via the Encodian Trigr App as below:

Final thoughts…

Hopefully, this post provides a detailed guide on how you can migrate your current Power Automate flows from a single document library, making them available across your entire SharePoint Online tenant with Encodian’ Trigr.’

We hope you’ve found this guide useful; please share any feedback or comments. All are welcome!

Deploy a Power Automate Flow to multiple SharePoint libraries or lists

Although Power Automate and SharePoint are both Microsoft products, they don’t interact as well as any of us would like…

But hopefully, you’ve already picked up some of our recent announcements regarding our new product ‘Trigr‘, which provides the following critical features for SharePoint and Power Automate integration:

  • Expose a single Power Automate Flow to all or targeted SharePoint sites and contained libraries and/or lists (no more copying!)
  • Enable a user to select one or more files or list items and start a Power Automate flow
  • Request additional information from the user (through a dynamic form) before starting the Power Automate flow

This article will focus on the first feature and provide a step-by-step guide covering how to set up your Encodian ‘Trigr‘ subscription and configure it to make a single Power Automate Flow available across all SharePoint sites and contained document libraries (or lists) within your SharePoint Online tenant instantly!

If you’d prefer a video tutorial, please check out the following: Activate and configure a ‘Trigr’ trial subscription.

This step-by-step guide is broken down into the following sections:

Fear, not. The entire process takes no more than 5 to 10 minutes!

Activate an Encodian ‘Trigr’ trial

The first step is super simple. To create an Encodian ‘Trigr‘ trial, complete the following form on our website: Encodian ‘Trigr’ Sign-Up Form.

Note: Providing the correct ‘Microsoft 365 Tenant ID‘ is critical. This is used to associate your Encodian subscription with your SharePoint Online tenant, and configuration issues will be created if the value is incorrect!

If you are unsure how to obtain the correct ‘Microsoft 365 Tenant ID‘ value, please review the following short article: Retrieve your Microsoft 365 Tenant ID.

If you still need help, please raise a support ticket with Encodian.

Install the ‘Trigr’ SharePoint Online App

So currently, to deploy a single Power Automate Flow to targeted SharePoint sites and contained libraries and/or lists, you’ll need to create multiple Power Automate flows. This is not ideal and is one of the reasons we made ‘Trigr‘.

Encodian ‘Trigr’ does not make copies of a flow, ‘Trigr‘ provides a SharePoint extension (App) which dynamically displays all required Power Automate flows to the user. Thus this is available everywhere, all SharePoint lists and libraries (or specific ones if you have applied a specific targeting configuration.

The first step, therefore, is to install the ‘Trigr‘ SharePoint Online app:

1. Download the ‘Trigr.sppkg‘ app package

2. Navigate to the SharePoint Admin Center by entering the following URL in your browser. Replace yourtenantprefix with your Microsoft 365 tenant prefix.

https://{your-tenant-prefix}-admin.sharepoint.com

3. In the left sidebar, select More features

4. Locate the Apps section and select ‘Open‘.

5. Click ‘Upload.

6. Select the preferred deployment option. We recommend deploying the Encodian Trigr app to all sites by selecting the ‘Enable this app and add it to all sites‘ option

7. Click ‘Enable App

mceclip2.png

8. Click ‘Close.

mceclip3.png

The Encodian ‘Trigr‘ SharePoint Online app has been deployed and will be available within your SharePoint sites (Document libraries and lists).

mceclip4.png

Create a Power Automate flow using ‘Trigr.’

Now that we’ve deployed the Encodian ‘Trigr‘ SharePoint Online app, we need to create a Power Automate flow which we’ll then make available across the SharePoint Online tenant.

The link between a Power Automate flow and the Encodian ‘Trigr‘ SharePoint Online app is created by the ‘When a user runs a Trigr‘ Power Automate trigger action.

mceclip0.png

When a user starts a Power Automate flow from the Encodian ‘Trigr‘ SharePoint Online app ‘Actions’ menu item, a call is made to the ‘When a user runs a Trigr‘ Power Automate trigger action to start the flow, passing all of the relevant context information; who started the flow, selected items/files, site address, library name, etc.

For this demo, I’m going to create a very simple flow :

1. Navigate to Power Automate

2. Click ‘Create‘ > ‘Automated cloud flow.

3. Type ‘encodian‘ in the search box

4. Select the ‘When a user runs a Trigr‘ action, and click ‘Create.

5. Complete the ‘Title‘ and ‘Description‘ fields

As the description implies, I will configure this flow to send the selected document to the current user.

6. Add the SharePoint ‘Get file content‘ action

6.a. Site Address: Select the ‘Site Address’ value provided by the ‘When a user runs a Trigr‘ trigger action

6.b. File Identifier: Select the ‘File Identifier‘ value provided by the ‘When a user runs a Trigr‘ trigger action

Next, we need to add the SharePoint ‘Get file properties‘ action to get the filename of the selected file, but before we do that, we need to consider a Power Automate ‘ism’!

The data from the ‘When a user runs a Trigr‘ trigger action is dynamic, so values are unavailable until runtime, like Power Automate variables. Power automate doesn’t handle this particularly well, so when you enter a dynamic value as opposed to a typed value into SharePoint connector actions, you will not be able to access the properties provided by the SharePoint action and thus cannot configure your flow for example:

1.gif

To work around this issue is very simple; When creating your flows, use hard-coded values, and once you have completed the configuration, go back and replace the hard-coded values with the dynamic properties:

2.gif

7. Add the SharePoint ‘Get file properties‘ action

7.a. Site Address: Select any SharePoint site (we will replace this later)

7.b. Library Name: Select any SharePoint library (we will replace this later)

7.b. Id: Enter ‘1‘ (we will replace this later)

8. Add the ‘Send an email notification (V3)‘ action

8.a. To Select the ‘User Email Address’ value provided by the ‘When a user runs a Trigr‘ trigger action

8.b. Subject: Enter a value using dynamic values as required

8.c. Body: Enter a value using dynamic values as required

8.d. Attachment: Select the ‘File Content‘ value provided by the SharePoint ‘Get file content‘ action

8.e. Attachment File Name: Select the ‘File name with extension‘ value provided by the SharePoint ‘Get file properties‘ action

We now need to go back and update the SharePoint ‘Get file properties‘ action to use dynamic values from the ‘When a user runs a Trigr‘ trigger action.

9. Add the SharePoint ‘Get file properties‘ action

9.a. Site Address: Select the ‘Site Address’ value provided by the ‘When a user runs a Trigr‘ trigger action

9.b. Library Name: Select the ‘Library Name’ value provided by the ‘When a user runs a Trigr‘ trigger action

9.b. Id:: Select the ‘Item’ value provided by the ‘When a user runs a Trigr‘ trigger action

 

10. Enter a name for your flow (we’d suggest the same as the ‘Title’ value set in step #5) and click ‘Save.

We’re done. The flow is fully configured and will work regardless of which document library it was launched from!

Deploy your Power Automate flow to all SharePoint sites

A quick recap! We’ve deployed the Encodian ‘Trigr‘ SharePoint Online app and created a Power Automate flow. We will now configure ‘Trigr‘ to make the Power Automate Flow available across the SharePoint Online tenant.

1. Navigate to your Encodian Account Portal

2. Login using the credentials supplied in the ‘Your Encodian Trigr Trial is ready!‘ email provided in Step 1 – Activate your ‘Trigr trial section.

3.  Select ‘Encodian Trigr’ > ‘Configuration’

4. Click ‘Add Action.

5. On the ‘Add Action‘ form

5.a. The Power Automate flow created in the Create a Power Automate flow using ‘Trigr’ section will be displayed. Select this item.

5.b. Update the ‘Title‘ and ‘Description‘ fields if required

5.c. Add a ‘Run Message‘ which will be displayed to the user after the flow has been triggered

5.d. Del-select the ‘Lists‘ checkbox in the ‘Appear in‘ section. Our flow is document library-specific, so we do not want the action to appear within lists.

5.e. Click ‘Create.

Note:

If you’d like to discover more about dynamic forms which enable you to capture data from end users before starting the flow, then please review: Add a ‘Dynamic Form’ to an Encodian Trigr Action

6. Your ‘Action‘ has now been created and will be available across all SharePoint sites

And via the ‘Trigr‘ SharePoint App:

Final thoughts…

Hopefully, this post provides a detailed guide on deploying a single Power Automate flow and making it available across your entire SharePoint Online tenant with Encodian ‘Trigr.’

We hope you’ve found this guide useful; please share any feedback or comments. All are welcome!

Merge Excel and CSV Files with Power Automate

Merge Excel and CSV Files with Power Automate

We’ve recently release several new capabilities for Encodian Flowr, including the new ‘Merge Excel Files‘ action. The ‘Merge Excel Files‘ flow action enables you to merge up to 1000 Microsoft Excel files (and related formats) into a single file of the selected output format. The following file formats are supported for merging:

  • XLSX
  • XLSB
  • XLST
  • XLSM
  • XLS
  • CSV
  • tabdelimited
  • ODS
  • spreadsheetml

The output file format can be set to either:

  • PDF
  • CSV (Available July 22)
  • TIFF
  • XLSX
  • XLS
  • XLSB
  • XLSM

Merge an array of Excel files to a single file

To showcase how to merge a collection of files using the ‘Merge Excel Files‘ flow action we’re going to create a manually triggered flow which obtains a collection of files from a SharePoint library and then adds the merged file back to SharePoint.

Please remember that the source location(s) of the files to be merged and the destination of the merged file can be anywhere Power Automate supports, such as Box, Azure Storage, OneDrive, Outlook, etc.

Step One

Create a new Flow using the ‘Instant cloud flow‘ option

Step Two

Enter a name for the Flow, select the ‘Manually trigger a flow‘ trigger action and click ‘Create‘ 

Step Three

Add a ‘Initialize variable‘ action

3.a. Name: Enter ‘Files’

3.b. Type: Select ‘Array‘ 

Step Four

Add a SharePoint ‘Get files (properties only)‘ action

4.a. Site Address: Enter the location of the target SharePoint site

4.b. List or Library Name: Select the target SharePoint document library

4.c. Limit Entries to Folder: Set to a specific folder if required

This configuration will obtain the properties for the following files:

Step Five

Add a SharePoint ‘Get file content‘ action

5.a. Site Address: As per step 4.a.

5.b. File Identifier: Select the ‘Identifier’ property provided by the ‘Get files (properties only)‘ action

Upon selection this will automatically place the ”Get file content‘ action into an ‘Apply to each‘ control, this is because the ‘Get files (properties only)‘ action returns an array of documents (one or more)

Step Six

Add an ‘Append to Array Variable‘ action

6.a Name: Select the ‘Files’ variable

6.b. Value: Add the following JSON to the ‘Append to array variable‘ variable

 {
   "fileName": ,
   "fileContent": 
 } 

6.c. Append the following properties as per the animation below:

The competed JSON value is as follows:

{ 
"fileName": @{items('Apply_to_each')?['{FilenameWithExtension}']},
"fileContent": @{body('Get_file_content')}
}

Step Seven

Add the Encodian ‘Merge Excel Files‘ action underneath the ‘Apply to each‘ action

7.a. Filename: Enter a name for the output document

7.b. Click the ‘Switch to input entire array‘ icon

7.c. Pass the ‘Files’ variable created in step #3

The configuration to create the merged file is now complete! Next, you need to add actions to do something with the merged file.. for this example, we’re just going to add the file to SharePoint.

Step Eight

Add a SharePoint ‘Create file‘ action

8.a. Site Address: Enter the location of the target SharePoint site

8.b. Folder Path: Select the target SharePoint library/folder

8.c. File Name: Select the ‘Filename‘ property from the the ‘Merge Excel Files‘ action

8.d. File Content: Select the ‘File Content‘ property from the the ‘Merge Excel Files‘ action

Your Flow is now complete and should follow this construct… albeit you may have a different trigger action!

Next, test your Flow and validate the merged file has been created:

Validate the resulting file has been processed correctly:

Finally

We hope you’ve found this guide useful, and as ever, please share any feedback or comments – all are welcome!

You can find further documentation and guidance on the Encodian support portal: Merge Excel Files